Postpartum Dark Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Balls (No-Bake, Gluten-free, Dairy-free)

Healthy Recipes

29 March 2019

 

For those of you out there who’ve ever had a baby — you know the hunger you experience postpartum is REAL.

But so is the struggle in figuring out what to eat. Especially when you’re sleep deprived, nursing 24/7 and living in perpetual brain fog for the first few days weeks. Ain’t NOBODY got any extra time to be spending in the kitchen.

But the postpartum phase is also such a crucial time to supply your body and brain with the nutrients it needs to heal (not to mention produce milk). And if you’re able to figure out a few easy ways to take care of them, they will take care of you, and you’ll feel more like yourself. Now I don’t about you, but when I feel better physically and mentally, I feel empowered to be a more patient, kind, generous and loving person to everyone around me, especially my baby girl.

So what’s a new mom to do?

  1. Send this No-Bake Dark Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Ball recipe to your tribe as an easy way they can help out post-birth
  2. If you’re pregnant now, you can whip up a few batches and store in the freezer in preparation
  3. Once you feel up to it post-baby, you can make a batch in 5 minutes and enjoy after 30 additional in the fridge (or you can skip chilling them as balls and eat the mixture straight out of the bowl, ain’t no shame in that game)

Any which way you choose, these balls should be a part of the plan. Not only are they super easy to make and work brilliantly as a quick snack or meal in between all those newborn feeds, but they’re made up of key nutrients to help balance your hormones and boost your milk supply. Basically, they’ll help you to feel good, so you can fully enjoy this super special time in your life.

How, exactly? Let’s quickly break down the science behind how the ingredients work to balance hormones postpartum.

 

POSTPARTUM HORMONE BALANCING INGREDIENTS 

+ Oats 

Oats are rich in iron, which many women are depleted in due to the loss of blood when giving birth. Maternal anemia (i.e. low iron levels) can decrease your milk supply, so this is an excellent food to add to your diet, if you can tolerate them well. They also contain other trace minerals like manganese, selenium and copper which support the thyroid gland (low-thyroid function is also common post birth).

+ Nut Butter

Nut butters are rich in healthy fats, and hormones are produced from fat and cholesterol, which means consumption of adequate amounts of the right kinds of dietary fat is crucial for achieving great hormonal health (i.e. you can’t create something without the necessary building materials).

They also provide you with a slow-burning source of energy and provide satiation to keep you fuller longer. I like to use Ground Up PDX’s Hazelnut Butter, as hazelnuts are a good source of Thiamine, which has a hand in producing new red blood cells to help you maintain optimal energy.

+ Flaxseed

Flaxseeds are high in fiber that support colon detoxification. Constipation is a common side effect during and post-pregnancy, which can cause buildup of toxins and excess estrogen to be circulated back into the blood stream. Estrogen dominance can cause many unwanted symptoms, such as mood swings, insomnia, irritability, depression, brain fog, fatigue, headaches, etc. so it’s important to balance out levels through supporting optimal digestion and elimination.

They’re also rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which have a ton of anti-inflammatory effects and are a crucial component of mental clarity and brain health.

+ Coconut

Coconut is a quality source of saturated fat (a building block of all hormones), that when combined with flaxseeds actually helps your body to absorb the omega-3 fatty acids, making them twice as effective.

It also has the ability to transform your cholesterol into pregnenolone, which is one of the essential building blocks for thyroid hormone-creation. Low-thyroid function is a common for many women postpartum, which often includes side effects like constipation, fatigue, weight gain (or inability to lose weight), dry skin, brittle hair or hair loss.

+ Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate is not only delicious, but rich in magnesium, a mineral required for over 300 enzyme reactions in the body (including sleep, muscle cramping, headaches, digestion and blood sugar). Magnesium is a building block of your “happy hormone” serotonin, which is crucial for calming the brain and promoting relaxation. Ensuring you get enough magnesium in your diet postpartum can help with preeclampsia, cramping, insomnia, mood swings and headaches.

 

So there you have it, a few of the many reasons why these Dark Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Balls need to be in your life post-baby.

And if you’re not pregnant, giving birth, or ever plan on being pregnant (heeeey all my male readers :)) have no fear, you don’t have to be to enjoy this snack. They’re delicious and healthy enough for anyone to enjoy, including my hubby, who’s probably eaten more of these than I have.

Happy NO-baking,

xx //

Lauren

 

Postpartum Dark Chocolate Chunk Nut Butter Balls

Cook time
0 hours 35 mins
Total time
0 hours 35 mins
postpartum snack balls

These energy balls are super easy to make and work brilliantly as a quick snack or meal in between all those newborn feeds. Made up of key nutrients to help balance your hormones and boost your milk supply, they'll help you feel good, so you can fully enjoy this super special time in your life.

Author: Lauren Chambers
Cuisine: American
Method: chilling
Diet: ayurvedic, gluten-free, dairy-free, plant-based, vegan, vegetarian
Dish type: snack, treat, dessert
Serves: 12 balls

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sprouted oats
  • ⅔ cup coconut shreds
  • ½ cup Ground Up PDX's Hazelnut Butter (use code SOFRESH15 to save 15% off your order)
  • ½ cup ground flaxseed
  • ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chunks 
  • ⅓ cup maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil, melted
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp sea salt 

Preparation

  1. Stir all ingredients together in a medium bowl until thoroughly mixed. Cover and let chill in the fridge for 30 minutes.
  2. Once chilled, roll into balls of whatever size you would like. I made mine large using a scooper (they can be very sticky) and it made about 12 balls.
  3. Store in an airtight container and keep refrigerated for up to 1 week or in freezer for 3 months. 
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